Technology for Teaching
 

 






Register for a course

 Using Microsoft and Google’s free "breakthrough" Artificial Intelligence (AI) apps for teaching and learning 

As simple to use as interacting with a web page or a Microsoft Word tab
(in fact that's how you use them)


A 3-hour NESA-endorsed course with two separate components:
-  30 minutes pre-workshop online self-study
-  2.5 hour after-school Zoom workshop (3:30 pm to 5pm)

$29 per teacher for single teacher enrolments
$19 per teacher if all teachers from a school enroll
 
 

Microsoft  Google 

 

Evidenced-based research* shows that the Microsoft and Google's  AI text-to-speech and speech-to-text apps will significantly enhance your students' achievement levels

*
See the section at the end of this page for comprehensive links to the relevant research

The eleven ways Microsoft and Google's AI apps boost* student achievement

1. Improves understanding, structure, presentation and punctuation in written work
2. Improves reading fluency
3. Increases retention of learning materials
4. Increases student motivation
5. Improves student engagement
6. Enhances reading intervention & reading support programs
7. Increases accessibility of materials
8. Improves student speech-making confidence and skills
9. Improves reading and comprehension skills
10. Automates speech-to-text typing

11. Automates transcription into text of video, YouTube, podcasts & recorded audio
 
*See the comprehensive research documentation at the end of this page

"Learning with auditory and visual text proved superior compared to engagement with visual only text".
Leahy, Wayne & Sweller, John. (2011). Cognitive load theory, modality of presentation and the transient information effect. Applied Cognitive Psychology. 25. 943 - 951. 10.1002/acp.1787.
"Incorporating an auditory processing step into what would otherwise be a solely visual task increases the brain's ability to evaluate, analyse, recollect and create"


Microsoft  Google 


Rapid advances in Deep Learning* Neural Network* Artificial Intelligence systems have allowed Microsoft and Google to provide text-to-speech and voice recognition apps with the power, intelligence, quality and ease-of-use to transform learning!
*
The 30 minutes pre-workshop self-study includes a basic introduction to Neural networks and Deep Learning to enable teachers to understand and explain those concepts


Click here to enroll

Details of the eleven ways Microsoft and Google's AI apps boost student achievement:

1. Improve understanding, structure, presentation and punctuation in student work

An example: A student answers the question: Do you think it's important for people to continue to travel into space? Why or why not? You may want to think about issues such as costs, dangers and benefits).

Below is the student’s draft response, pasted into Microsoft’s text-to-speech AI, which reads it back to her.

Student uses Microsoft’s text-to-speech AI to have it read back to her.

The student makes spelling, grammar and punctuation modifications detected through listening to the text read by Microsoft text-to-speech, using Word's Track Changes to red underline additions and red strike-through deletions

The student's spelling, grammar and punctuation modifications after listening to the text being read back to her

The teacher gives the class guidance on how to structure an extended response, and asks them to review their responses, including listening to them being read back to them by Microsoft speech-to-text, and improve them by taking account of her guidance.

 The teacher repeats with the class her earlier guidance on how to structure an extended response, then asks them to again listen to their response being read back to them by Microsoft speech-to-text and again review it.

 

The student enhances her response by applying her teacher's guidance, assisted in her thinking by listening to Microsoft Text-to-speech reading her work to her.

The student's modifications made by her as a result of her listening to her teacher's guidance and having Microsoft Text-to-Speech read her work back to her

 

2. to 7.

Whilst listening to Microsoft speech-to-text reading a document the student reads the hard copy.  Alternatively, the student first reads a section of the hard copy, then listens to that section being read by Microsoft speech-to-text.

That simple process has these effects:

2. Improves student reading fluency through read-along and read aloud of textual materials spoken as audio
3. Increases retention of learning matter
4. Increases student satisfaction with undertaking the learning
5. Improves student motivation and increase the likelihood that students will apply themselves to their learning
6. Enhances reading intervention & reading support programs
7. Increases the accessibility of learning materials

Listening to the speech-to-text audio of a text whilst reading the hard copy

 

8. Improve speaking and speech-making skills and confidence

The student identifies structure and punctuation changes that will improve her speech by listening to Microsoft Text-to-Speech read it to her.

She practices the speech reading it aloud simultaneously with Microsoft Text-to-Speech, adjusting her and Microsoft Text-to-Speech's speaking speed to achieve and practice an optimum delivery.

 

 

9. Improve reading skills and comprehension through manipulating phonics and phonemes in Microsoft speech-to-text

Heteronyms, i.e. words that, depending on context, have the same spelling but have different meanings and phonemes in their pronunciation, are a challenge for learner readers, and in the past have been a challenge for text-to-speech apps. 

But the advances in Microsoft AI's Deep-Learning is evidenced by its text-to-speech understanding the contexts of, and pronouncing correctly 40 of the 60 heteronyms below (the green outline).

And, as it is daily provided with more and more English texts to read and listen to, it moves closer to being able to understand the context of, and speak the correct pronunciation of all English heteronyms.

Microsoft’s text to speech pronounces 20 out of these 30 heteronyms correctly (the green box). 

The Deep Learning cycle - as more data is fed in, deeper learning occurs

Deep Learning

Why are heteronyms relevant? 
Examining heteronyms and difficult to read or pronounce words through Microsoft’s text to speech provides a scaffold for students to experiment with phonics and phonemes and improve their speaking and reading.

And learning spelling and pronunciation by manipulating phonics and phonemes in Microsoft text to speech is fun, with students correcting Microsoft text to speech's incorrect pronunciation of heteronyms (for example those outlined in red above) and other words through modifying the word's spelling, even from correct to incorrect as highlighted in green in the second image below. 

Microsoft’s text to speech supports student learning of phonetics and phonemes in correcting the system’s mis-pronunciations.

The student learns phonics and phonetics whilst helping Microsoft’s text to speech to pronounce incorrect words correctly

Students also learn context in pronunciation by adding words that affirm or change the context to help (or hinder) Microsoft speech-to-text discerning the correct pronunciation, as highlighted in yellow above.

  

10. Automate own voice speech-to-text typing and transcription

Microsoft incorporated the Dictate feature into Word some time ago.  However their recent behind-the-scenes change to use their Deep Learning Artificial Intelligence system to power it has advanced it to an extraordinary level of accuracy.

Word Dictate now provides students and teachers with a highly accurate means of dictating their work, and have Word transcribe it as they read it or speak it.

Students to dictate their work, or read anything they wish to have in textual form into Word, and have word transcribe it for them as they read it.

 

11. Automate recorded voice speech-to-text typing and transcription (video, YouTube, podcasts, recorded audio, recordings of you delivering your lessons etc.)

Word Dictate will transcribe into a Word document any podcast, YouTube video, or any other recorded audio or video.  You simply  configure the correct audio input/output options on your computer, select the Word Dictate button, start playing the video or audio, and watch Word type the text of the audio into the document.

Automated direct transcribing by Word of audio playing on the computer from from videos, podcasts etc

You can also have Word transcribe for you the audio of you delivering a lesson

Word transcribe for you the audio of you delivering a lesson


NESA credit for the Professional Development

Pedacomp NESA accreditation

NESA approval and accrdeditation details Completing the professional development Using Microsoft and Google’s free "breakthrough" Artificial Intelligence (AI) apps for teaching and learning will contribute 3 hours of NSW Education Standards Authority (NESA) Registered and endorsed professional development towards maintaining Proficient Teacher Accreditation in NSW.


Australian Professional Standards for Teachers for which the professional development is NESA registered and endorsed:

1.1.2, 1.2.2, 1.3.2, 1.5.2, 1.6.2, 2.1.2, 2.5.2, 2.6.2, 3.2.2, 3.3.2, 3.4.2, 3.5.2, 4.1.2, 6.2.2, 6.3.2, 4.4.2

 
Australian Professional Standards for Teachers addressed by this professional development - Full details
 
Standard 1 - Know students and how they learn
Focus 1.1.2 - Physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics of students
Descriptor Use teaching strategies based on knowledge of students’ physical, social and intellectual development and characteristics to improve student learning.
Focus 1.2.2 - Understand how students learn
Descriptor Structure teaching programs using research and collegial advice about how students learn.
Focus 1.3.2 - Students with diverse linguistic, cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds
Descriptor Design and implement teaching strategies that are responsive to the learning strengths and needs of students from diverse linguistic,
cultural, religious and socioeconomic backgrounds.
Focus 1.5.2 - Differentiate teaching to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities
Descriptor Develop teaching activities that incorporate differentiated strategies to meet the specific learning needs of students across the full range of abilities.
Focus 1.6.2 - Strategies to support full participation of students with disability
Descriptor Design and implement teaching activities that support the participation and learning of students with disability and address relevant policy and legislative requirements.
Standard 2 - Know the content and how to teach it
Focus 2.1.2 - Content and teaching strategies of the teaching area
Descriptor Apply knowledge of the content and teaching strategies of the teaching area to develop engaging teaching activities.
Focus 2.5.2 - Literacy and numeracy strategies
Descriptor Apply knowledge and understanding of effective teaching strategies
to support students’ literacy and numeracy achievement.
Focus 2.6.2 - Information and Communication Technology (ICT)
Descriptor Use effective teaching strategies to integrate ICT into learning and
teaching programs to make selected content relevant and meaningful.
Standard 3 - Plan for and implement effective teaching and learning
Focus 3.2.2 - Plan, structure and sequence learning programs
Descriptor Plan and implement well-structured learning and teaching programs
or lesson sequences that engage students and promote learning.
Focus 3.3.2 - Use teaching strategies
Descriptor Select and use relevant teaching strategies to develop knowledge, skills, problem solving and critical and creative thinking.
Focus 3.4.2 - Select and use resources
Descriptor Select and/or create and use a range of resources, including ICT, to engage students in their learning.
Focus 3.5.2 - Use effective classroom communication
Descriptor Use effective verbal and non-verbal communication strategies to support student understanding, participation, engagement and achievement.
Standard 4 - Create and maintain supportive and safe learning environments
Focus 4.1.2 - Support student participation
Descriptor Establish and implement inclusive and positive interactions to engage and support all students in classroom activities.
Standard 6 - Engage in professional learning
Focus 6.2.2 - Engage in professional learning and improve practice
Descriptor Participate in learning to update knowledge and practice, targeted to professional needs and school and/or system priorities.
Focus 6.3.2 - Engage with colleagues and improve practice
Descriptor Contribute to collegial discussions and apply constructive feedback from colleagues to improve professional knowledge and practice.
Focus 6.4.2 - Apply professional learning and improve student learning
Descriptor Undertake professional learning programs designed to address identified student learning needs.

 

Research - Details

1. Improve understanding, structure, presentation, and punctuation in student work

Conclusion:
Presentation of textual information in an auditory as well as a visual form is beneficial (the modality effect).  Within a cognitive load framework, the modality effect produces a more efficient use of the available working memory resources: by engaging two channels of working memory when verbal information is presented in the auditory modality, learning can be facilitated. 

Research details:
Kalyuga, S. (2010). Narration or Visual Text: When Does Modality Effect Apply?. In J. Sanchez & K. Zhang (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2010--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1052-1058). Orlando, Florida, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).   

Conclusion:
Students receiving instructional material by text and audio performed better on both declarative knowledge and conceptual knowledge components of an assessment than students who only received instruction material by text.

Research details:
McKeown, J. (2010). Effect of Medium on Student Knowledge Retention and Concept Application in an Online Learning Environment. In D. Gibson & B. Dodge (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2010--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1546-1551). San Diego, CA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).     

Conclusion:
Students complete study tasks more quickly when information is available in sound and text. 

Research details:
Reilly, A. (1999). Reading and Listening: Issues in the Use of Displayed Text and Recorded Speech in Educational Multimedia. In B. Collis & R. Oliver (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 1999--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 798-803). Seattle, WA USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).   

Conclusion:
Text-to-speech is an effective self-study tool in improving students’ pronunciation.

Research details:
Eksi, G.Y. & Yesilçinar, S. (2016). An Investigation of the Effectiveness of Online Text-to-Speech Tools in Improving EFL Teacher Trainees' Pronunciation. English Language Teaching, 9(2), 205-214. Retrieved September 8, 2020 from 
https://www.learntechlib.org/p/193020/.  

 

2. Improve student reading fluency and information retention through read-along and read aloud of textual materials transcribed to audio using Text-To-Speech

Conclusion:
Use of text and text-to-speech improves reading fluency using Repeated Reading and Readers Theatre.  

Research details:
Parenti, M.A. & Chen, X. (2015). Growing Reading Fluency: Engaging Readers with Technology and Text. Journal on School Educational Technology, 10(4), 1-6.   

Conclusion:
Fluency increased in students with emotional/behavioral disorders when listening to text-to-speech before reading the text themselves.

Text-to-speech synthesis was effective in vocabulary acquisition, fluency, word meaning, spelling, and comprehension in students with behavioral disorders.

Research details:
Dawson L, Venn ML, Gunter PL. The Effects of Teacher versus Computer Reading Models. Behavioral Disorders. 2000;25(2):105-113. doi:10.1177/019874290002500202  

Conclusion:
The retention of sentences learned through the activity of reading aloud (RA) with audio materials created by using Text-To-Speech (TTS) speech showed that  students in the RA instruction group sustained higher retention.

Comments by students in the RA group indicate that the scaffolding by a teacher during lessons had long-term effects on students’ abilities in retaining classroom sentences.

Research details:
Kataoka, H., Ito, M. & Yamane, S. (2015). Retention of English sentences learned by reading aloud using Text-To-Speech (TTS) speech sounds: A longitudinal study in a Japanese high school. International Journal of Research Studies in Educational Technology, 5(1),. Consortia Academia Publishing.   

 

3. Increase retention of learning matter

Conclusion:
Presentation of textual information in an auditory as well as a visual form is beneficial (the modality effect). Within a cognitive load framework, the modality effect produces a more efficient use of the available working memory resources: by engaging two channels of working memory when verbal information is presented in the auditory modality, learning can be facilitated. 

Research details:
Kalyuga, S. (2010). Narration or Visual Text: When Does Modality Effect Apply?. In J. Sanchez & K. Zhang (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2010--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1052-1058). Orlando, Florida, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).   

Conclusion:
The retention of sentences learned through the activity of reading aloud (RA) with audio materials created by using Text-To-Speech (TTS) speech showed that  students in the RA instruction group sustained higher retention.

Research details:
Comments by students in the RA group indicate that the scaffolding by a teacher during lessons had long-term effects on students’ abilities in retaining classroom sentences.

Research details:
Kataoka, H., Ito, M. & Yamane, S. (2015). Retention of English sentences learned by reading aloud using Text-To-Speech (TTS) speech sounds: A longitudinal study in a Japanese high school. International Journal of Research Studies in Educational Technology, 5(1),. Consortia Academia Publishing. 

 

4. Increase student satisfaction in undertaking the learning

Conclusion:
Narration is effective as an alternative presentation modality. This was recommended to increase the accessibility of the instructional product, to reduce the amount of time spent going through the lesson, and to increase the likelihood that learning of the procedure will take place.

Research details:
Solomon, H.M. The effect of audio narration in computer-mediated instruction on procedural fluency by students of varying reading levels. Ph.D. thesis, The Florida State University.

Conclusion:
Student surveys of preference, usability, and experience indicated significantly higher satisfaction scores for learning that included audio readings compared to learning without audio readings.

Research details:
Miller, M. & Piller, M. (2005). Principal factors of an audio reading delivery mechanism: Evaluating educational use of the iPod. In P. Kommers & G. Richards (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2005--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 260-267). Montreal, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).   

 

5. Improve student motivation and increase the likelihood that students will apply themselves to learning content

Conclusion:
Narration is effective as an alternative presentation modality. This was observed to increase the accessibility of the instructional product, to reduce the amount of time spent going through the lesson, and to increase the likelihood that learning of the procedure will take place.

Research details:
Solomon, H.M. The effect of audio narration in computer-mediated instruction on procedural fluency by students of varying reading levels. Ph.D. thesis, The Florida State University.   

Student surveys of preference, usability, and experience indicated significantly higher satisfaction scores for learning that included audio readings compared to learning without audio readings.

Research details:
Miller, M. & Piller, M. (2005). Principal factors of an audio reading delivery mechanism: Evaluating educational use of the iPod. In P. Kommers & G. Richards (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2005--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 260-267). Montreal, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).   

 

6. Enhance reading intervention & reading support programs

Conclusion:
A reading intervention program using text-to-speech showed a significantly higher rate of WCPM (words correct per minute) development. Results show that repeated reading programs help increase reading fluency.

Research details:
Martin, C., Elfreth, J. & Feng, J. (2014). Effect on Reading Fluency of Struggling Third Grade Students: Computer-Assisted Intervention versus Teacher-Guided Intervention. Presented at Mid-South Educational Research Association Annual Meeting 2014.

Conclusion:
Fluency increased in students with emotional/behavioral disorders when listening to text-to-speech before reading the text themselves. Text-to-speech synthesis was effective in vocabulary acquisition, fluency, word meaning, spelling, and comprehension in students with behavioral disorders.

Research details:
Dawson L, Venn ML, Gunter PL. The Effects of Teacher versus Computer Reading Models. Behavioral Disorders. 2000;25(2):105-113. doi:10.1177/019874290002500202  

Conclusion:
Text-to-speech synthesis was effective measuring vocabulary acquisition, fluency, word meaning, spelling, and comprehension for students with literacy difficulties.

Research details:
Lance, A.A., McPhillips, M., Mulhern, G., & Wylie, J. (2006). Assistive software tools for secondary-level students with literacy difficulties. Journal of Special Education Technology, 21(3), 13-22.  

Conclusion:
Text-to-speech synthesis improves vocabulary acquisition, fluency, word meaning, spelling, and comprehension for students with learning disabilities.

Research details:
Hebert, B. M., & Murdock, J. Y. (1994). Comparing three computer-aided instruction output modes to teach vocabulary words to students with learning disabilities. Learning Disabilities Research & Practice, 9(3), 136-141.  

 

7. Increase the accessibility of learning material

Conclusion:
Narration is effective as an alternative presentation modality. This was observed to increase the accessibility of the instructional product, to reduce the amount of time spent going through the lesson, and to increase the likelihood that learning of the procedure will take place.

Research details:
Solomon, H.M. (2005), The effect of audio narration in computer-mediated instruction on procedural fluency by students of varying reading levels. Ph.D. thesis, The Florida State University.   

 

8. Improve student speaking and speech-making confidence and skills

Conclusion:
Speaking the speech along with an audio of it increases confidence and fluency of presentation

Research details:
Laskowsk, L. (2012) Painless Presentations: The Proven, Stress-Free Way to Successful Public Speaking, Wiley press, ISBN: 978-1-118-43149-8  

 

9. Improve reading skills and comprehension through students experimenting with manipulating phonics and phonemes in Microsoft speech-to-text  

Conclusion:
Students who used text-to-speech recognition to experiment with phonics manipulation in spoken text acquired pronunciation skills significantly faster than a control group.

Research details:
Huang, S., Moller, L. & Poirot, J. (2004). Using Interactive Multimedia Computer Technology to Support Reading Instruction. In R. Ferdig, C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, N. Davis, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2004--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3905-3910). Atlanta, GA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)  

Conclusion:
The re-introduction of text-to-speech recognition in a reading support phonics-based remedial group achieved significantly improvement in reading accuracy.

Research details:
Chatterjee, M., Fairweather, P. & Adams, W.H. (2004). The Re-invention of a Learning Tool: why was it even necessary?. In R. Ferdig, C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, N. Davis, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2004--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2833-2838). Atlanta, GA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).   

 

10. Automate own-voice speech-to-text typing and transcription

Conclusion:
Students who used speech-to-text recognition (STR) generated texts in their learning outperformed the students who did not. Students reported that the STR-texts were useful for following the teacher, confirming content, clarifying vocabulary, and making up missed information.

Research details:
Huang, Y.M., Shadiev, R. & Hwang, W.Y. (2016). Investigating the effectiveness of speech-to-text recognition applications on learning performance and cognitive load. Computers & Education, 101(1), 15-28. Elsevier Ltd.

 

11. Automate recorded-voice speech-to-text typing and transcription (video, YouTube, podcasts, recorded audio, recordings of the teacher delivering their lesson etc.)

Conclusion:
Students who used speech-to-text recognition-generated (STR) texts outperformed students who did not.

Students reported that the STR-texts were useful for clarifying vocabulary, and making up missed information.

Research details:
Huang, Y.M., Shadiev, R. & Hwang, W.Y. (2016). Investigating the effectiveness of speech-to-text recognition applications on learning performance and cognitive load. Computers & Education, 101(1), 15-28. Elsevier Ltd.

 

 
  
 
Pedacomp
Technology for Teaching

Pedacomp Australia
Unit 1, 27 Canberra Street
Wentworth Falls
  NSW  2782
ABN: 72 961 011 548

Web:  http://www.pedacomp.org
Email: info@pedacomp.org
Tel:  02-4757-4243    



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